5 Best Story Writers From Throughout History

Have you ever wondered who the best story writers of all time truly are? Below, we’ll go over 5 of the most well-known, influential writers of all starting.

Since the dawn of time, men and women have been passing stories on to each other. At first, this was only done orally, passing stories from one generation to another while sitting around camp fires.

However, in 1440 along came the invention of the printing press. With it, authors were now able to create stories, have them printed, and then distributed with ease.

But there is a prevalence of news and social media in today’s modern culture. Therefore, people aren’t often as interested in a good story as they once were.

So with that in mind, I would be a good idea to review some of the best, most prolific story writers from all throughout history.

Below, we’ll dive into our top 5 best story writers of all time, starting with Aesop. Who was writing as far back as about 600 years before Jesus Christ.

framed eyeglasses on top open book best story writers

Aesop

There is, unfortunately, much uncertainty surrounding Aesop. But most believe he was a born in Greece sometime between 560 B.C. and 620 B.C.

However, even today, Aesop’s collection of stories and fables are known as true works of literary art.

Aesop is best known for fables his such as “The Tortoise and the Hare”, and “The Goose Who Laid the Golden Eggs”. These stories use powerful imaginary and ordinary animals placed in bizarre situations.

Which, in the end, always reveals an invaluable truth or moral lesson.

The Lion and The Statue - Fables of Aesop best story writers

Although Aesop’s fables are mainly targeted at children, they are no doubt an excellent addition to any book lover’s reading list.

Check out The Classic Treasury Of Aesop Fables

The Brother’s Grimm

Also known as Children’s And Household Tales, Grimm’s Fairy Tales was first published in December 1812.

Written by brothers Wilhelm and Jacob Grimm, Grimm’s Fairy Tales was originally a collection of about 86 short fairy tale stories.

However, by the time the 7th edition of the collection was published, Grimm’s Fairy Tales contained a total of 210 uniquely written fairy tales.

narrow pathway near tress best story writers

You’ve most certainly heard some of the Grimm brothers’ tales, such as Hansel And Gretel or Rapunzel. But with several hundred unique stories in the collection, there are sure to be many more stories, which will easily captivate your attention.

So, for the best look at the brothers Grimm’s stories, make sure to check out the full collection of stories in Grimm’s Fairy Tales.

Edgar Allan Poe

Known for his macabre short stories, Edgar Allan Poe is often noted as one of the most influential, evocative writers in American history.

He’s mainly known for his dark, twisted stories.

However, Poe was a truly prolific writer, critic, poet, and editor. And he has written dozens of well-known short stories in many different genres of literature.

red book on white textile

Poe has a unique writing style that’s somewhat elaborate and hard to read for younger readers.

However, his use of the English language combined with his own personal flair is what truly make reading his short stories worth all the work.

For one of the best looks into Poe’s diverse writing styles and genres, make sure to check out the complete collection of Poe stories and poems.

Find author cheap and affordable text books and novels at Text Book Nova.

James Joyce

As of the more modern short story author on today’s list, James Joyce’s works were published at the onset of the 20th century.

However, his collection of short stories, known as Dubliners is the masterpiece that really skyrocketed his career into stardom.

First published over a hundred years ago in 1914, Dubliners is a collection of short stories. Each story is aimed at depicting the life of Middle class Irish citizens living in Dublin at the beginning of the century.

Most of the stories in the collection focus on their main characters having a epiphany. Joyce described this as a life-changing realization or illumination about one’s self.

The first few stories are narrated by younger protagonists. But as the stories continue, they progressively deal with the lives of gradually older characters.

First editions of James Joyce's 'Dubliners' now classed as antiques

Among his other masterpieces, Joyce is also known for the epic novel titled Ulysses. What’s unique about Ulysses is that it mirrors the happenings and story line of Homer’s The Odyssey.

Stephen King

Who doesn’t love a good horror story?

Back in 1973, Stephen King sold his first novel, Carrie. This first book became so successful King has become one of the most famous and prolific of the 20th century.

In fact, Carrie, as well as dozens of other King stories, such as Pet Semetary, It, have been made into Hollywood films. Which have achieved the same level of success, if not more, than the novels.

More recently, however, King has recently a new collections of stories, titled If It Bleeds. Which is a must-have collection for any true Stephen King or horror fans.

Stephen King's New Book If It Bleeds to Debut a Week Early | Tor.com

If It Bleeds is a collection of 4 short stories, which are all guaranteed to have your heart beating out of your chest by the time you’re done reading them.

5 Best Story Writers From Throughout History

Some of the story collections we’ve discussed today are fairy tales or fables mainly targeted at children. However, their authors are no doubt extremely influential writers, whose masterpieces have endured through of years.

That’s why, if you’ve truly a book lover, word nerd, reader, writer, short story enthusiast, or poet, you’ve come to right place. And absolutely must add these 5 authors and collections to your reading list this summer.

Bart’s Books in Ojai

By Sophia Rasura

Editor’s Note: This article is the winning submission to the Textbook Nova 2020 Scholarship.

My favorite place to find new books is one of the most fascinating places filled with light and wonder that has always inspired discovery. When I am not in New York studying psychology, I am at home in Ojai, California with my younger sister, parents, two goldens, and a picket fence. Nestled between two side streets off the main avenue in our town of under 10,000 people is Bart’s Books, what I think of as my heart in this valley. Founded in 1964, it is almost entirely outdoors with books lining the inside by author last name and genre: my favorite being an undivided section nestled into the vines and wall of the history of hypnosis. It feels like yesterday that I was seventeen and there on a 70 degree day, reading Lost Horizon by James Hilton and its allusions to Ojai. The staff there consists of a twenty-year old hippie girl who reads in the back room and two Danish brothers in their mid-40s who seem to have the whole store memorized and take me on adventures & scavenger hunts for just-in first copies from Isabel Allende or Borges. When a book I’m looking for isn’t there, those two scour the whole world-wide internet to find a copy and give it to me, severely discounted, because I’ve been a bookworm in those forrest green walls since middle school. 

Bart’s has this open courtyard area amidst the masses of fiction authors categorized by last name letter with these black iron chairs and tables that somehow repel heat in a way that just seems ominous. I could sit there for hours reading books and roaming around the shaded areas and sections. My favorite memory is going in their small art book room, where they sort the art books chronologically by movement. The dusty smell of an old library archival section fills the tiny room and I become immersed in the moment. With a soft pencil stroke, I imagine the Dutch brothers & hippie woman receiving book donations and trades and writing the little number at the top of the inside page with a little line, over and over again in a kind of meditative way. The saggy plant next to the door in somehow has survived since I was a freshman in high school; I personally created a whole narrative that it had a depressive episode because it was so close to the gallery of art books but could never go inside. My first love, my best friend who emanated an artistic aura, bought me my first colossal book: aptly named Love. It was simply a collection of black and white photos of intimacy & touch. I read The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls in a small school desk from the 60s in a patch of shade during my eighth grade summer, one I remember incredibly clearly because of my obsession with memoirs at the time. I kept a Five Star brand red college-ruled, spiral-bound notebook of every single day that summer, every little event that I thought would change my life (from a CPR training at junior lifeguard camp or an inspiring takeaway and insight on symbolism) with a mechanical pencil. When I interviewed for an advanced English course over the summer before the beginning of high school, I still think about how much I felt like a snow cone on that 100-degree day, as my fears melted so quickly, meeting with my future teacher at Bart’s Books by the Ojai pottery and discussing Jeanette’s life and my perspective on sexual assault and her development. I recollect that memory now and it makes me so grateful to have that space where so much learning has been fostered over the years. 

During this quarantine and heavy isolation from social interaction, Bart’s Books as a space is closed to the public and there is no sitting inside, trading in books for new ones, fascinating chats where I discover books and authors I have never heard of. The Instagram stories are always blossoming with hope: the bookshelves that line the walls outside Bart’s are utilized with the honor system and everyone is being truthful and paying in quarters, local artists are selling totes and donating the money to Bart’s, the hippie woman will post stacks of books (from sex and love guides to Kant’s works) and offer drop-off or contactless pick up. Although the physical entity of the space is temporarily gone, the ideology of Bart’s and its values live on and continue to influence my life and literacy, which is, to say this completely lax, so cool!!! In a time where my own education feels detached and all work needs a giant push of motivation from deep in my brain, my love of reading for fun remains constant due to the enthusiasm and joy I feel at Bart’s and with the people who make it special to me. The excitement I felt when I drive up next to that red door and see one of my favorite book-recommenders walking up to my passenger seat with the just-arrived copy of Aphrodite by Isabel Allende felt similar to the feeling of just sipping a lavender lemonade on a summer afternoon reading it inside. As we do the ceremonial glove-to-glove, mask-wearing hand-off of the books, I get a boost of eagerness: I can’t wait to sit down and immerse myself into this! I capitalize off that feeling and apply it to my education: “I can’t wait to read Professor Johnston’s choice of paper on memory transformation & the senses!” 

Learning at Sarah Lawrence gives me many of the same emotions as I get when I am sitting at Bart’s Books. The unique pedagogy of the school requires seminars of less than 16 students, meeting with professors once bi-weekly to work on an individual project adjacent to the class (usually around 20 pages on your topic of choice) for two credits. As an avid reader and literature-lover, the opportunity to take a tiny class in a topic like Neuroscientific Perspectives on Mindfulness or Language and Capitalism (both real, both courses I have taken) gives me the uncommon potential that most students dream of: to read a whole bunch of articles, books, and information on a specific topic you love inside a larger topic you love. To illustrate this, I did my conference project on trauma held in the body during my fall mindfulness psychology course. I read a book by James van der Kolk, The Body Keeps the Score, that was both incredibly interesting to me in a literature-for-fun context, but a reading that I could analyze and receive credit for. There is a sparkle in my eye of pure possibility that Sarah Lawrence nurtures. I am able to pursue my passions and have conversations with the experts, my professors, which in turn recommend more and more books to read. Before Sarah Lawrence, I found out that what makes me feel most like myself is discussing literature with others and gaining insight about the world through reading. Without the encouragement of the booksellers at Bart’s, the personalized recommendations by professors and friends, I would not appreciate the world the way I am accustomed to now. 

In my biased eyes, books are the best present. After a brunch with my faculty advisor Elizabeth Johnston and our advisory group, we sat in her mid-century modern living room amidst her gigantic selection of books of all genres. I felt the same warmth radiating from the walls, the same curiosity that I feel at Bart’s. Interested to learn more, my first question was: “Do you see a person and know a book to recommend to them?” Her answer? “Yes, sometimes I get to know someone, even a little bit, and know a great book for them!” One aspiration I have for completing my college degree is to be able to reach this same level of knowledge of books and their benefits and affect on the reader. My most recent experience with this occured right before I left New York, sitting in the Artichoke Pizza restaurant in Chelsea with my friend Erica. We both are dedicated bookworms, carrying around books in our bags at all times like Rory from Gilmore Girls. As we wait for our margherita pizza to arrive and discuss maintaining healthy relationships and fundamentals of caring in light of COVID-19, she reads a passage of Bell Hooks’ All About Love to me. Hooks outlines what constitutes love and what separates it from dependency and caring, a concept I have always understood but never verbalized. When I am at Bart’s Books, my heart fills with that same intimacy from receiving a book hand-selected from a loved one with me in mind. By receiving this scholarship, I will have the resources to continue to learn through literature and grow this passion.

Visuals!

3 Tips On Preparing For College Or University

Preparing for college or university this fall? With the start of the school year just around the corner, it’s important to make the most of your remaining time off. And start getting your life in order for first semester.

There’s no doubting the fact that summer break does a lot of good for students, physically, mentally, and spiritually.

But that doesn’t mean that all school responsibilities should be thrown to the wind. You should never wait until the day before your first class to start getting your life ready school.

Therefore, I thought it would be a good idea to focus today’s blog post on preparing for the upcoming school year.

Whether you’re a freshman, sophomore, or senior, you can easily benefit from getting things in order in advance. Then, when your first day of class rolls around, you’ll already be prepared to seize the day to its fullest potential!

Gather Your School Supplies Early

Before you actually begin attending your classes, you probably won’t actually know everything you’ll need for first the course. However, gathering a few essential supplies before school starts is a great step towards making sure you’re ready for your first day

Think about it!

You’re in school.

So things like notepads, pens, pencils, binders, graph paper are things that you can almost never have too much of. And you’re almost guaranteed to need them on your first few days of school.

assorted pen and colored papers in organizer case

Therefore, it’s a good idea to sit down a few week before school starts and write a list of all the basic school supplies you think you might need.

Depending on the type of courses you’re taking, you might also need a few extra tools too. So, especially if you’re studying math or science, don’t forget to add tools calculators geometry sets to your list.

Do A Bit Of Research

Obvious, you shouldn’t spend your summer hitting the books and studying every day. In fact, your summer break should be used for giving yourself a bit of time to relax and temporarily forget about your course load.

However, with the school year just around the corner, it’s never a bad idea to do a bit of research. Read up on some of the topics that you’ll soon be learning about in school.

For instance, maybe you’re taking a course is English literature.

In this case, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to brush up on a few classic authors from throughout history. Maybe read a couple plays by Shakespeare or anything else you’re sure to touch on in class.

person reading book sitting with cross legs preparing for college

Taking a course in physics?

Why not pick up a copy of Stephen Hawking’s A Brief History Of Time, which gives a broad overview of universal physics, written in an easy-to-understand tone.

Of course, you don’t have to bored yourself and spend your entire summer break studying for your course. After all, that’s what your classes are far.

But the point is that if you know you’re going to be learning about something in class. It’s not a bad idea to spend a bit of time learning about it in advance.

Then, when you do touch on these subjects in your classes, you’ll already be pre-acquainted with the topic matter. And more than ready to challenge any quizzes or tests that might get thrown your way.

Review Old Notes And Coursework

Especially if you’re a sophomore or senior, it’s always a good idea to review your old school notes from the previous year or any text books that you might still have.

It’s truly astounding how many things we forget over the course of a single year.

So if you’re hoping to maintain good grades throughout the year, and obtain a solid understanding of whatever it is you’re studying, it’s crucial to regularly review the things you’ve learned in the past.

person flipping book preparing for college

Even if you’re only leaving high school, and heading into college as a freshman, it’s still a good idea to review some of your previous year’s coursework and reading material.

Again, just to help you brush up on some of your knowledge.

In the end, the more you know and understand about your studies, the more likely you’ll be to succeed and maintain a good GPA.

Make The Most Of Your Time

As I mentioned, I’m not suggesting that you spend your entire summer break studying and getting ready for next semester. But the fact is that being prepared can go a long way in helping you have an enjoyable, successful year of school.

So, make sure to enjoy your summer, but don’t waste it or let it slip you by.

Remember, it’s always important to make the most of your time.

So have fun with your time away from school.

But don’t forget to plan ahead, pick up a few essential school supplies in advance, brush up on your studying and review your old notes, and you’ll be well on your way to started your first semester of the year on the right foot.