How to Enjoy Your General Education Classes in College

How to Actually Enjoy Your General Education Classes in College

Kinda sucks, doesn’t it?

You enter college thinking it’s about taking courses on topics you want to study, not more general education requirements.

In reality, most of your first two years of college are spent taking these mandatory classes (aka your “gen ed” courses). Like most things in life, there are pros and cons when it comes to these required subjects.

For example, when you’re undecided on your major general education can help you figure out what classes interest you. Sometimes the topics we think we’re passionate about–or think we should be passionate about–don’t really interest us at all.

Either way, since gen eds are a must-do for graduating from college let’s talk about what you can do to make the most of them.

 

How to Enjoy Your General Education Classes in College

How to Actually Enjoy Your General Education Classes in College

 

Find Out Who Teaches the Class (Before You Sign Up)

If you haven’t already heard of it, Rate My Professors is the website that will become the game-changer to your college experience. You just plug in the name of a professor into their search box (or the name of your school) and you’ll find reviews/ratings of their classes from your fellow students.

Obviously, you should use your best judgment with the reviews. Not every review is reflective of the professor. The students’ effort affects their experience in class too. However, it’s great for getting a rough idea of the experience. If every single rating for a professor is 1 out of 5 or you discover all of the reviews mention an impossible grading system, you probably don’t want to take that class.

I always used Rate My Professors when it came to my gen eds. What did I get out of it? I met some professors that I genuinely loved learning from because they made the class fun.  


Choose Topics that Grab Your Attention

Even though they’re required courses, you get to choose which classes to take. There is still a lot of wiggle room when it comes to general education. Not a fan of geometry? Take a statistics class to fulfill your math requirement. Don’t want to take another American History 100 class? Consider a class in art history or an area of history that interests you.

The more engaged you are in the topic, the better you’ll do in class. It’s just easier when you like what you’re learning. Who knows, you might even decide to switch majors after taking. That’s why colleges recommend you don’t put off these courses. You might discover a new opportunity or passion in life…or discover your current major isn’t the path you wanted to take after all.

If you take these classes early on, there’s still plenty of time left to change your major or figure out what industry excites you.

 

Don’t Make it Too Hard on Yourself

Not a morning person? Think carefully before you sign up for that 8 am MWF class. Like I mentioned earlier, you should choose your classes based on what subject matter interests you. Not on the convenience, availability, or how easy you think it will be.

Some courses might fit better into your schedule, but that doesn’t mean they’re a good fit. If you think about it, each class costs you hundreds of dollars in tuition. Why take something that is a total bore and waste of your time?

In order to make the most of your general education, don’t take a class that will make you miserable. Or if you take the class and realize it’s not for you, drop it ASAP before the cutoff date.

 

Talk to Your Classmates

Your gen eds are a great place to meet people outside your major. Engage with your classmates!

You can find amazing new friends and create relationships with people. Once you get to your junior year of college, the rest of your classes will mostly be with the same group of people. General education courses can introduce you to cool friends you may not have met on campus otherwise.

How to Do Well in College: 5 Tips for Student Success

How to Do Well in College: 5 Tips for Student Success

So you want to learn how to do well in college?

Whether you’re new to campus or want to take things to the next level this semester, here are 5 tips for student success.

Let’s jump into it.

1. Get 7 Hours of Sleep

It might seem like stating the obvious, but getting enough sleep each night is the key to student success.

Why? When you get 7-8 hours of sleep each night, you’ll perform better at school. Rest keeps you alert, focused, and motivated. On the other hand, sleep deprivation can lead to increased anxiety and stress.

But who doesn’t want to sleep more, anyway?

Well, college isn’t exactly known for its downtime. Late night sessions at the library and all-nighters during exam time aren’t exactly news here. And to be 100% honest, there likely will be times where you find yourself up WAY later than planned to finish working on a project or writing the rest of that paper.

Hey, nobody’s perfect.

But if we’re being real, those late night study sessions can usually be prevented with better planning. Yes, you’re juggling a lot in school. You’re busy running from class to class and balancing homework with extracurricular activities or jobs—but you probably have a little more time than you realize.

So how can you find enough time to get in those zZz’s and stay on top of your studies? Keep reading to find out.

How to Do Well in College: 5 Tips for Student Success

2. Break Up Your Tasks

This student productivity idea has two steps. First, find pockets of time where you can complete some work.

Then break up your major projects into smaller chunks. Instead of trying to cram in 150 pages into one study session, you could read a couple of chapters while you’re waiting for your next class to start.

You might need to reorder your to-do list.

I’ll bet that if you find yourself with 10 minutes to kill, you probably spend it on social media. However, keep in mind those few minutes will add up big time throughout the day. What are some other ways you can squeeze in a small task during that time?

I know you can find some pockets of time in your day if you try hard enough. Because the truth is, another benefit of breaking down your tasks is the big assignments become less overwhelming. For example, when you’re working on a paper. Have you ever found yourself staring at a blank page, struggling to get started? Writer’s block is pretty common.

What if you could cut the amount of time you spend on writing in half by turning that 15-page term paper into a step-by-step process?

Start with gathering research, put it into a thorough outline, and then turn it into a paper. If you flesh out your outline, the paper will nearly write itself. (Seriously, try it out and let us know how it goes!)

When you start using your time more efficiently, you can improve your performance.

How’s that? Let’s go back to the cram session. If you’re trying to read 150 pages in one session, it’s tough. You’ll probably rush through the material and skim through a lot of it, missing out on a lot of information.

At the time same, when you know you only need to read 1 or 2 chapters you’ll feel less pressure to rush through the material.

 

3. Participate in Class

Believe it or not, your professors want you to learn.

Participating during their lectures will actually help you retain the material better. This is because it forces you to think critically and analyze what your professor is teaching. What’s more, participation makes the class more interesting.

When your professors know you want to learn, they’ll naturally try to help you in any way they can. Class discussions offer you the opportunity to receive feedback from your professors that will help you improve and grow as a student.

Plus, starting conversations leads to a mentor relationship. If something ever DID come up or you made a mistake, your professor will probably be more understanding with a student they know is hard-working.

How to Do Well in College: 5 Tips for Student Success

4. Get Organized

Now, you don’t need a ton of supplies to stay organized. An accordion binder (labeled for each class) and a planner are a great place to begin.

Take these with you to every single class so they’re always handy. Pencil in assignments, exams, and other major due dates into your planner as soon as you find out about them.

Then, take time at the beginning of each week to (roughly) plan things out.

In this case, you’ll be able to see what’s on your agenda ahead of time and go into each week with a game plan.

 

5. Take Notes (Lots of Them)

You already know you’re supposed to take notes–but I want to offer you one particular piece of advice on note-taking.

Physically write them out. In a notebook during class. Even if your professor gives out printed notes or study guide…take your own. According to NPR, handwriting out notes seems to help your brain retain what you’re learning better than note-taking on a laptop or tablet.

Remember how we said participating in class helps make it more interesting? So does taking notes.

In fact, professors seem to LOVE throwing in extra credit on exams that came directly from lectures. It’s their reward for attending class. It never hurts to take advantage of extra points, right?

 

In Conclusion

Overall, college is learning time management skills. Getting enough rest, organizing your deadlines, and following along in class (through participating and note-taking) are all ways to boost your performance in school.

And breaking down huge projects into smaller tasks will make everything more manageable–and less overwhelming.

Find Out the Average Starting Salary for College Graduates in 2018

Find Out the Average Starting Salary for College Graduates in 2018

I remember it so vividly.

Watching my parents smile proudly at me. Snapping hundreds of selfies with my classmates. Walking across the stage and shaking the dean’s hand.

You never forget the day you graduate from college.

Graduation day is packed with emotion. There’s the rush of excitement, accomplishment, and awe.

The next day? Reality sinks in. It’s time to start your job hunt. You’re thrilled to take the next steps in “the real world” but there’s still a lot of uncertainty.

How long will it take me to find a job? How much will it pay? Where do I even WANT to work?

LendEDU decided to investigate what it’s really like for brand-new college grads entering the workforce this year. They polled 1,000 graduates from the Class of 2018 to see how their job search has gone over the last couple of months (and how much they’re really making).

So what’s the starting salary for a new college graduate?

Let’s look into their results.

 

How Much New College Graduates Should Expect to Make

Good news: LendEDU found that nearly half of the former students they surveyed already found their first full-time job this summer. When asked how they would describe their current situation, they responded:

  • 41.3% of 2018 graduates have landed a job
  • 34.4% are still on the search for a job
  • 24.3% are taking summer off to figure out their next steps

Find Out the Average Starting Salary for College Graduates in 2018

In less than two months, many recent graduates have already ended their job search with success! 20% of those who found a full-time job listed that it wasn’t in a field like tech, health, education, engineering, or in media.

If you’ve ever felt unsure about your job future due to your college major–rest assured that there is still a lot of potential work out there for you.

What’s the Average Starting Salary for College Graduates in 2018?

According to The Class of 2018 Career Report, most students expect to make between $36,000-50,000 per year in their first job out of college. But does this expectation match the job market today?

While over ¼ of new graduate ARE making that much in an entry-level position, 33.4% are actually earning below $35,000.

You might be thinking, “But wait–I went to college to make a good living!”

I know the feeling.

But this study matches my experience with my first job out of college, where I was making $30,000. It wasn’t easy. I was living in a metropolitan city where my rent took up the majority of my income.

However, it wasn’t a major difference from life in college. I knew how to stretch my budget in order to get by. I even saved some money in the first year! It turns out, I wasn’t stuck at that salary for long either–I started searching for jobs after a year of getting experience in my field.

Flash forward 6 months. I had landed my DREAM job and my salary jumped up to expectations. Was it worth sticking out that first year being broke? I definitely think so.  

Here’s a closer look at the results from Salary Expectations vs. Graduates Actual Salary:

Find Out the Average Starting Salary for College Graduates in 2018

As you can see, some graduates are earning over $50,000 but it’s the exception. In this case, their job duties probably involve some specialized skill set or they have work experience under their belt.

 

So How Did These Graduates Find Their First Job?

One of the biggest challenges new graduates face when they’re looking for their first full-time job is knowing where to look.

Then again, it’s never been easier to search for jobs today. You can search online through job boards like Indeed and Glassdoor–or look directly on a company website to find out what roles they’re currently hiring for.

At the same time, don’t ignore your personal network. It turns out nearly 30% of recent college graduates found their job through connections.

Find Out the Average Starting Salary for College Graduates in 2018

Don’t think you have the right connections? Reach out to your friends and family, anyway. They have years of experience (in work AND life) where they’ve built connections. You never know which connections could be valuable.

As you can see from the chart above, there are plenty are ways to find a job outside of your network too.

All in all, it’s safe to say future salary projections are on the minds of every college student. If you’re a current student or soon-to-be graduate, you can prepare for what’s next by gaining some “real world” work experience, an internship, and building your network.

Want to get the full scoop on the rest of the survey results? Check it out here on the LendEDU blog.

6 Must-Have Tech Gadgets for College Students

6 Must-Have Tech Gadgets for College Students

Seriously, why do college checklists have so much stuff on them?

When some of them have upwards of 150 items, how do you know what you actually need to bring along to school?

Obviously, you need school supplies, textbooks, clothing, and shower gear. But to be 100% honest, outside of your basic living essentials…you probably need less than you think.

Especially when it comes to school supplies–I didn’t use half of the things that I first brought along to college.

Your dorm room or apartment will be small and you won’t have a lot of room to store these things. The less you bring, the less clutter you have (which means less time you spend on cleaning).

However, there are a few tech items that will make your life WAY easier away from home. Let’s take a quick look.

6 Best Tech Gadgets for College Students in 2018

 

1. Portable Phone Charger

Let’s be real–we’re on our phones all the time. It doesn’t take long to drain the battery. The only problem is, your schedule tends to be all over the place in college.

You could have some days with back-to-back classes and then you’re heading to work straight from your last class. Even if you DO have breaks in between your classes, your dorm room or apartment might not be anywhere close.

You’ll end up stopping for food in between classes or hanging out the library to study. It just might not make sense to go back to your room during the day.

That’s where portable chargers come in. This one is lightweight and charges your phone incredibly fast.

 

2. Lap Desk

My parents gifted me a lap desk before I went off to college. At first, I kind of laughed at it. The lap desk didn’t really seem necessary because I already had a desk in my room. However, it turned out to be a total game-changer.

Sometimes you just don’t want to get out of bed.

Or it could be the total opposite.

Maybe you’re getting major cabin fever and need to escape your room for the common area. I frequently met up with my neighbors and friends in the commons space to study together or work on homework. My lap desk offered a sturdy surface so I could get work done from anywhere. This lap desk is less than $20, holds your laptop, and has a space for your tablet.

 

3. Portable Speaker

Whether you have friends over for a movie night or want to hang out with some background music, you want a compact, portable speaker for your room.

Do yourself a favor and get a speaker that’s compatible with most mobile devices via Bluetooth, in case you want to let somebody else play DJ for the night.

This speaker is small, shockproof, and water-resistant. Perfect for your new shared space. (It’s built to withstand outdoors and the elements, if that’s your thing!)

4. Noise-Canceling Headphones

Because nothing is worse than going to the library to study and being forced to listen to your neighbor’s loud conversation. Be in your own little world instead.

Noise canceling headphones are perfect for blocking out distractions. You can also listen to your favorite music, hit the gym, tune out your roommate, or watch videos at a normal volume–and eliminate any background noise.

 

5. Roku Streaming Stick

Your dorm room or new apartment doesn’t come with cable? Not a problem if you have a Roku Streaming Stick.

If you’re not familiar with Roku, it’s a remote device that allows you to stream  content from sites like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and more. they’re super affordable.

The only thing you have to do is connect your Roku stick into your Wi-Fi and to your TV. Before you buy this, double check to make sure that your TV has an HDMI port. That’s how you’ll connect the Roku to your TV.

Most TVs today come with this, but it just depends on how old your TV set is.

 

6. Kindle Tablet

While you can certainly get away without owning a tablet in college, it definitely has some advantages. Especially the Kindle. Here’s why.

You can save a TON of money on textbooks. Use a textbook search engine like Textbook Nova to find the cheapest version of your assigned textbooks. Another way to save is to use Amazon Textbook Rentals.

Their textbook rental service allows you to rent textbooks for an entire semester OR for however many weeks you think you’ll need it.

The great part about having a Kindle or Fire tablet is that you can immediately download these text books onto your tablet. Amazon also allows you to extend your rentals for 30 days or renew them again for another semester, in case you need to keep the textbook around for a little longer.

 

When Is It Too Late to Change Your College Major?

Is It Too Late to Change My College Major?

So you want to study a different field. When is it too late to change your college major?

Want to know a secret?

The truth is more than 75% of all students change their majors at least once during college. I changed my major three times! And the degree I graduated with was in the field of my dream career–it was definitely worth it.

Check this out:

Most advisors suggest that you change your major after your first year. This gives you a chance to take some of the core “introduction” classes and you’ll have an idea of whether or not you enjoy your chosen field.

What if you’ve stuck out that first year and it still doesn’t feel right?

Maybe it’s not a matter of whether or not you like the subject matter in your courses. It’s just not a fit. Sometimes students go into majors in college because we think it will lead to the best jobs or we were following the advice of our parents.

But what should you do when do you find yourself wondering if you’re in the right program?

Let’s take a look.

 

Is Changing Majors Bad?

Is It Too Late to Change My College Major?

The downsides to changing your major:

  • It can take longer than you planned to earn your degree
  • You’ll end up paying more tuition if you stay in school longer
  • If your parents support you financially they’ll probably want a say in the decision

Here’s another side of the matter.

College is big-time expensive. But what’s the point in spending thousands of dollars on your education if you don’t LIKE what you’re studying? If you find no meaning in your classes, you’ll probably feel the same way about a career in the same field.

Trust me.

You don’t want to spend your entire life in a job that makes you feel miserable. We spend the majority of our lives at work. I’m not saying you have to be in love with your jobs to live a happy life because that’s not realistic. Some of our dreams just can’t support us financially.

But imagine waking up every single day with a feeling of dread about what lies ahead. It’s not a great way to live.

There are no right or wrong reasons to switch majors.  

Students make the change because:

  • They weren’t interested in the coursework
  • The classes were too difficult
  • Their courses led them to discover a new area of interest
  • They found out about potential opportunities in another field

Let’s consider the ramifications of changing your major in school and what that looks like during each year.

 

When Is It Too Late to Change Your College Major?

Is It Too Late to Change My College Major

Changing Majors Freshman Year:

If you’re like me, you started having second thoughts about your major immediately.

Here’s the thing. In my case, it was good that I realized my first instinct wasn’t right for me. Just because I was interested in something didn’t mean the potential jobs in that area were the right fit.

The only problem? I chose to declare a new major after the first quarter of school. My new major was based on another course I was taking that I happened to enjoy. I hadn’t given it enough practical thought, which led to me changing majors again later in the game.

 

Changing Majors Sophomore Year:

Switching majors after your first year of college is pretty common. in fact, this is when most students change their major.

Why’s that? You could have known right away that you didn’t like the classes that you were taking. but still wanted to give it a full year to decide. Plus, you had time to get away from the routine of day-to-day life on campus and think about school over the summer. It’s not too late yet. Even if you’re halfway through your sophomore year.

 

Changing Majors Junior Year:

This is where it starts to get a little tricky. If it’s the beginning of your junior year and you spent the first two years focusing on gen ed requirements, it’s not too late to rethink things.

Once you’re halfway through or reaching the end of your junior year, it’s time to consider that it may not worth it to change your major.

Why? It makes more sense financially to attend grad school rather than extending your time in an undergraduate program.

 

Changing Majors Senior Year:

Changing majors in your senior year of college doesn’t make sense. You’ve stuck it out this long–keep pushing through. There’s always post-grad school if you need more education to pursue another career path.

Because the truth? Most college grads aren’t working in their field of study after school. According to the Washington Post, only 27% of college grads have a job related to their degree.

In Conclusion

All in all, there’s no specific year where it’s considered too late to change your college major. However, if you want to spend less money on your education and get out of school faster, it’s best not to change you’re major after junior year.

The Best Summer Jobs for College Students in 2018

Best Summer Jobs for College Students in 2018

Can I be totally honest with you?

Getting good grades in college isn’t THE most important goal for an undergraduate student.

Look, graduating with honors is an incredible achievement. If you plan to apply to grad school or continue your education, earning high grades is your main focus. But you know what else is equally valuable, yet less discussed?

Having work experience.

If you’ve never gained any work experience before graduating, you’ll find the job search to be pretty tough. According to the NACE’s Job Outlook 2017 survey, more than 90% of employers prefer to hire candidates with work experience. 65% of that group prefer candidates to have relevant work experience to the job they’re applying for.   

With this in mind, summer is the perfect time to find a seasonal job. Plus, it never hurts to earn some extra cash!

So what type of work should you look for as a student? Here are 6 summer jobs suited for college students in 2018 (even if you have no experience).

6 Summer Jobs for College Students

Best Summer Jobs for College Students in 2018

1. Tutoring

Tutoring is awesome work for a student. It’s flexible and can pay pretty well for a part-time gig, especially depending on your location. To make your summer job even more beneficial, tutor students in a subject that’s related to your studies.

Tutoring companies are often looking for K-12th grade tutors, and the pay usually starts at $25 per hour. You can also seek tutoring positions for the ACT or SAT exams–these can pay up to $50-60 per hour!

2. Office Temp Job

While working in an office doesn’t sound like a fun summer job, you get the opportunity to add valuable experience to your resume.  Especially if your field will likely lead you to an office job.

There are a ton of positions in any company that works out of an office, but without any experience, you should be looking for temp jobs for entry level positions, like data entry, administrative assistant, or receptionist. You can search for temp agencies in your area or apply to temp jobs on your own search using Indeed, LinkedIn, or even Craigslist.

3. Student Research Assistant

Want to learn on the job and keep your brain refreshed over summer break? Research assistant positions can pay anywhere from $10-18 per hour. You develop skills like communication, critical thinking, and how to analyze data.

If you plan to continue your education after undergrad school, student research assistant jobs look great on your resume.

4. Retail Job

Unless you’re a fashion major, you might be wondering how retail applies to your future. But don’t knock it right away. Retail jobs offer a lot of flexibility, and the summertime is a major hiring season for retailers. Plus, you can quickly move up the ranks in a retail job.

For example, I know a grad student who took a part-time sales position during the semester. She was a hard worker and quickly earned a small promotion. Not even two months later she was offered a temporary management position for the summer.

Retail doesn’t have much to do with this student’s future path, however, she can show growth in a company while speaking to leadership and other transferable skills management offers you.

5. Tech Job

The tech industry is booming–get your foot in the door! Tech jobs don’t have to be about web development and programming (though those are great skills for any graduate to have).

They can vary across a wide range of industries, including marketing, social media, and software engineering. Breaking into the tech industry is a worthwhile opportunity for every job candidate.

6. Internship

It’s not too late to still get that summer internship…if you act fast. Companies are still posting internship opportunities, even though we’re in the first week of June. Check out Indeed.com and LinkedIn.

The upside to this is the hiring process will likely be faster because they’re looking to fill these internship spots–and you win the oppotunity to gain direct experience in your field.

5 Cheap Summer Vacation Trips for College Students

5 Cheap Summer Vacation Trips for College Students

Summer is here. Have you made any vacation plans yet?

While Netflix binges might seem irresistible, you won’t create memories or lasting friendships on the couch. Make this summer your most exciting one yet and build your own adventure!

Don’t think you can afford to take a vacation? I know the feeling, but sometimes a small adventure can become a thrilling experience. You can plan that graduation trip or weekend getaway with your friends, even if you don’t have tons of money to spend.

Here are 5 summer vacation ideas for college students in the US.

 

1. Go Camping

Take a camping trip with your friends for a getaway that everyone can afford. And the best part? You won’t even have to travel far. Every state has national parks you can take advantage of for a short road trip.

Check out the rules for the park you want to visit because each one will vary on the their rules and pricing. I’ve gone camping for as little as $3 for a 3-day parking permit! Of course, major parks like Yellowstone can cost between $30-50 for a parking fee, but split between a group of friends it’s still way cheaper than booking a hotel or cabin.

Borrow a tent or invest in a lightweight tent, like this Amagoing tent (it fits up to 4 people). Tents can get pricey, but if you’re not a serious camper there’s no need to invest in an expensive option. You don’t need much to enjoy the camping experience. Just being surrounded by nature and relaxing with your friends is enough to refresh you from a long semester.

 

2. Tour Your Own City

Chances are, even if you live a major city you’ve never experienced everything it has to offer. It’s easy to put off local activities when you tell yourself you can just visit on another day, or maybe the novelty of some attractions wear off when they become overrun by out-of-towners.

But playing tourist in your own town IS actually cool and budget-friendly. (Not from the city? Take a short road trip to the closest city in your state!)

Make it a weekend escape. You can book a cheap hostel or pitch in on a hotel room with your friends–staying away from home will make the experience feel even more special. Plus, it helps you avoid further procrastination on the idea. You’re not going to waste the money you spent on booking a place to stay…

Afraid some well-known tourist spots might be too expensive? Don’t worry, most attractions offer student discounts.

5 Cheap Summer Vacation Trips for College Students

3. Spend the Day Hiking

Looking for some excitement with your crew this summer? Go on a hike!

Hiking makes an awesome day trip. It’s also an incredible workout…made even better by the fact you barely realize you’re working out. Hiking is practically free. The only tools a beginner needs to bring along are comfortable shoes, water, snacks, and sunscreen.

Research the trails in your area. You might be surprised to discover there are scenic hiking spots right in your backyard. Plan out your route ahead of time to convince your friends to join you on the trail.

4. Plan a Road Trip

Some of my favorite memories from college are linked to roads trips my friends and I took, even if it was just overnight or a 2-day getaway.

Here’s why you should take a road trip:

  • You find new places you probably wouldn’t discover otherwise.
  • Spending hours in a car encourages bonding and fun conversations.
  • You have the opportunity to become more spontaneous.

Still seems expensive? It doesn’t have to be a month-load road trip across the country. There are plenty of destinations in every region. Your road trip can be in your own state or just a few hours down the road. If there’s a group of you, pitch it on a hotel room.

If you’re traveling with one friend? Cut costs by camping out in your car with an air mattress that inflates to fit across the backseat of a car. I used this air mattress for a road trip through Colorado and we loved it.

Just keep in mind one thing. While last-minute decisions and stops along the way are part of the action, you should at least map out some road trip destinations in your region first.

5 Cheap Summer Vacation Trips for College Students

5. Go on a Food Tour

Who doesn’t love good food?

Plan a local “cheap eats” food tour this summer for a cheap trip. You can make one big run of it or spread it out over the summer. A good friend of mine loves the TV show Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. We made it a point to try as many food destinations from the show as possible in our area a couple of summers ago. Most of them were totally new to us and it felt good to support mom-and-pop restaurants.

Guy Fiere has a bestselling book series based on his show. This edition of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives is great to have on hand for traveling–the print version comes with a pullout map of the US that features every restaurant location.

Studying Tips To Help You Be Successful This Semester

Studying can be tough and when you are in college it you simply cannot avoid tests, quizzes and exams. So here are some studying tips for you to ensure that you are successful this semester.

These tips are relatively simple all you need to do is follow them no matter what. Stick to these and you will see how you excel this semester.

Schedule A Time

Similar to your classes/lectures, you need to set aside time for studies as well. Nothing but studies. You need to schedule some time for some uninterrupted studying. You could even do it bit by bit during your normal activities keep your college books closeby always. Or there are online books you could start some online studying slowly. It’s a little like that Shia Labeouf video… “Just Do it”

Set the best time when you feel the most alert and fresh. It could be early morning, evening or late at night whatever works out best for you.

Comfortable, Study Space

Now the second thing is about having an environment to study. It can be difficult to study in a dorm or rather impossible because sometimes friends are unable to take a hint that you need to study. Or simply you guys are having so much fun that the idea of studying sounds boring right? It happens. But studying is important and to clear the semester you have to study. Empty classrooms in the building, unoccupied library floors are great for quiet studying. Find a cozy corner and get to it.

Pack your bag with some snacks so your time is not wasted on trips to vending machine. Music is great for math/chemsitry so have some instrumentals or classical music with you. Make the best study environment for yourself so that you are not distracted and can focus fully. Put your phone away on silent. Take a phone break every half hour for five minutes.

Practicing a Study Method

For some re-reading the notes and college text books is sufficient enough so are able to absorb quickly. For some flash cards work best. They are really old and can assist you in getting as much information you mind can retain for your next if it involves a lot of vocabulary or terminology.

If writing them yourself is too much trouble you could get study material online from online books to free online flashcards.

Find a method and stick to it

As stated earlier, different methods and techniques work for different people. Some students are comfortable in studying from online lectures and online books. For those who cannot afford the costly books, there is also the option of getting cheap textbooks easily. These cheap textbooks not only affordable and find them a great help too.

So whatever that helps you in studying and in retaining information do not stop doing it. If you tend to get bored of monotonous study methods and college books, try something else for some time. But if they are helping you in getting good grades then it is wise to continue with them.

So, stick to a schedule find the best studying method and stick to it. Being consistent is the key and you shall see for yourself how your grades go up.

Good luck!