3 Easy Ways to Save Money in College

We’re sure you’re well aware of all the buzz surrounding college tuition. With an average price tag of $20,000 for four years of school, it goes without saying that higher education is expensive. 

However, this doesn’t mean that you can’t cut costs in some areas of school. Today, we’re going to show you a few tips on how to save money in college (wherever possible). Let’s cover three proven tips that’ll help you get your degree without spending more money than you have to. 

1. Avoid Paying Full Price for Textbooks

College students spend an average of $655 per year on textbooks, according to the National Association of College Stores. That totals to about $2,620 in 4 years. Could you think of something better to spend that money on?

I bet you can.

So what’s the alternative to buying brand new textbooks from your college’s bookstore? Here are a few solutions:

Sometimes there is no way to get around this like a physical workbook that you need to write in and turn in, or online content that is registered to your student ID.

Sometimes you just can’t get around the new edition of a textbook. Maybe there’s a physical workbook you need for assignments, or the increasing trend of online materials that come with your textbooks. No matter what you decide to do, just make sure that buying brand new textbooks is always your last resort. It could save you thousands of dollars in the long run. 

We offer one of the largest databases online for searching for textbooks and academic media at the lowest price—browse our textbook search engine at Textbook Nova.

2. Get as Much Free Money as You Can!

Start saving money early by applying for as many grants and scholarships as you can. It might seem like scholarships are only available to straight A students, but you’d be surprised to learn that are thousands of ways to qualify for rewards.

You can begin by searching for…

  • Federal grants 
  • State grants
  • Employer scholarships (this is a hidden gold mine!)
  • Volunteer grants
  • Institutional grants (churches, temples, organizations)
  • Academic scholarships 
  • Skill-based scholarships
  • Hobbies or club scholarships
  • Local awards
  • And much more…

Scholarships and grants don’t have to be paid off and can go towards your college education.  So apply for them as early as possible. And leave no stone unturned! Trust us, when it’s 10 years down the road and you’re trying to pay off your education… every dollar adds up.

Likewise, you can get help from your financial aid counselor. They’ll happily walk you through the grant application process to see what you qualify for. 

Want to avoid the hours spent on online searching? Check out The Ultimate Scholarship Book 2020. Not only will you find the details on over 1.5 million scholarships and grants—including how to apply for each one—but you’ll also discover tips on how to best search for awards, writing a remarkable application, and how to avoid scams.  

Find your copy of The Ultimate Scholarship Book 2020 here:

3. Let Your Advisor Lead the Way

It’s reported that the average graduate of a four-year college takes the equivalent of a full extra semester of classes, meaning an extra 12 to 15 credits.

In a time where the cost of college tuition is only rising, it’s crucial to make sure that you’re not wasting money (or your time) on classes that you don’t need in the long run. The sooner you graduate, the sooner you can launch your career.

And this is where your college advisor comes in.

Talk to them about creating a pathway that highlights the classes that are actually necessary for your degree. It’s common for students to get lost in a sea of information during their first two years of school. We can 100% relate. However, this lack of proper guidance can lead to making costly decisions. 

If you go straight to your advisor early on, you might be able to avoid the same mistakes. Their advice could save you hundreds or even thousands in the long run. 

It’s inevitable that your finances will take a hit from college. 

But if you take the initiative, you might find yourself in a minority of students. These students avoid spending hundreds, if not thousands, in unnecessary expenses. Do you have other tips on setting aside some extra cash during school?

4 Fictional Book Characters You’d Want to Be Best Friends With (And The Ones to Avoid)

If you could be best pals with a fictional character, who would it be?

We love exploring the world of the fiction books. And if you’re a fellow bookworm, you know what it’s like to get attached to your favorite characters.

Naturally, we’re drawn to the characters we can relate to the most. Their stories comfort us. We get a glimpse into their innermost thoughts—which is something we could only dream of in real life.

Today, we’re sharing the fictional characters you’d want to be best friends with (plus, one group of people you’d definitely want to avoid). Let’s dig in.

Circle of Friends by Maeve Blinchy

Benny Hogan from Circle of Friends is our favorite fictional bestie. Circle of Friends begins with Benny and Eve’s friendship as schoolgirls, and follows them through university.

Through new friends, first love and family tragedy, the two remain devoted to each other—cracking each other up under pressure. Honestly, certain parts of the novel are slightly dated now because it’s set in 1950’s Ireland. For example, teenage Benny is courted by her father’s sketchy, much-older apprentice. And while he’s definitely meant to be a creep in the book, a grown man planning to marry a teenage girl is gross on another level (sixty years later).

Still, lasting, supportive friendship is never dated. The movie version is a pretty pale imitation of the novel, but we’d still be friends with film Benny too.


Other People’s Houses by Abbi Waxman

Other People’s Houses by Abbi Waxman tells the story of large and small dramas in a tiny neighborhood of interlocking families and friends. There are a lot of awesome friendships in this ensemble novel, but Frances Bloom is the one we’d choose for our bestie.

Calm without ever being unsupportive, reliable, and so comfortable in herself, Frances would be a perfect friend. We would absolutely invite ourselves over for tea with Frances. (But we’d ring the bell and wait to be invited in… we learned that much from reading the book.)

The Ship of Brides by Jojo Moyes

Author Jojo Moyes is most famous for Me Before You… but her earlier novel, The Ship of Brides is a hidden gem. At the end of World War II, Australian brides are being shipped to the UK where their new British husbands await them. Four very different girls are assigned to share a room on an aircraft carrier-turned-women-carrier, and most of the novel takes place on their
journey.

And let’s be honest, it’s not even really Maggie’s story. Her roommates Avis, Jo, and Frances have much wilder arcs and much more shocking reversals than staid Mags. An Outback girl, Maggie struggles to adjust to the separation from everything she’s known, limited quarters after open spaces, and the new constraints of her growing pregnancy.

Still, Maggie’s the one we want to befriend. With her good humor and hard work, we just know she’s going to manage post-war rationing and new British in-laws just fine.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Elizabeth Bennett from Jane Austen’s classic Pride and Prejudice would definitely make an A+ pal. Jane is just too nice, right? It would be nearly impossible to be friends with someone so determined to see the good in everyone and everything.

But one thing’s for sure—sensible and snarky Lizzie would keep us entertained at boring events. Not to mention, we’re pretty sure she’d be great at deconstructing the evening in carriage home too. Lizzie doesn’t use her wit cruelly, even if she could definitely say some things about Charlotte’s choice of husband. Or Lydia’s disaster romance.

The Hunting Party by Lucy Foley

Finally, the fictional characters we’d NEVER want to be friends with: literally any of the college pals from Lucy Foley’s mystery novel The Hunting Party.

This crowd of former friends should limit their interactions to the occasional Facebook like, not pretend they’re still super-close and take trips to the deserted highlands together. Okay, fine, so this is a murder mystery… but let’s not let that one person’s murderous impulses distract from the fact that all of these “friends” are awful humans.

What do you think? Which fictional characters would you want to hang out with?