25 Inspiring Quotes from Books to Motivate You

String Lights on Book - 25 Quotes from Books to Motivate You

Ever noticed how some books stay with you long after you’ve read them?

Remarkable books are enchanting. Think about the last captivating book that you read. What made it so unforgettable?

These are books that draw you and let you escape into another world. You can’t bring yourself to put it down. They have the power to entertain, teach, and inspire us.

Sometimes a sentence jumps out at you because it sheds insight into your life. Here are 25 memorable quotes from books about life — for the times when you need a little extra inspiration and motivation.

 

25 Quotes from Books to Motivate and Inspire You

1. People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.

Harper Lee from To Kill a Mockingbird

 

2. “Work hard, know your shit, show your shit, and then feel entitled. Listen to no one except the two smartest and kindest adults you know, and that doesn’t always mean your parents. If you do that, you will be fine.”

Mindy Kaling from Why Not Me?

 

3. The goal isn’t to live forever, the goal is to create something that will.

Chuck Palahniuk from Diary

 

4. “Nothing in life is as important as you think it is, while you are thinking about it.”

Daniel Kahneman from Thinking, Fast and Slow

 

5. All endings are also beginnings. We just don’t know it at the time.
Mitch Albom from The Five People You Meet In Heaven

 

6. Everything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.
Dan Brown from Digital Fortress

 

7. “Our words have power, but our actions shape our lives.”

Rachel Hollis from Girl, Wash Your Face

 

8. “Forgiving isn’t something you do for someone else. It’s something you do for yourself. It’s saying, ‘You’re not important enough to have a stranglehold on me.’ It’s saying, ‘You don’t get to trap me in the past. I am worthy of a future.'”


Jodi Picoult from The Storyteller

 

9. “No man should judge unless he asks himself in absolute honesty whether in a similar situation he might not have done the same.”

Victor E. Frankl from Man’s Search for Meaning

 

10. “No one can tell what goes on in between the person you were and the person you become. No one can chart that blue and lonely section of hell. There are no maps of the change. You just come out the other side. Or you don’t.”

Stephen King from The Stand

 

11. “There is a kind of magicness about going far away and then coming back all changed.”

Kate Douglas Wiggin from New Chronicles of Rebecca

 

12. “And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”

John Steinbeck from East Of Eden

 

13. “It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.”

Paulo Coelho from The Alchemist

 

14. “We study history not to know the future but to widen our horizons, to understand that our present situation is neither natural nor inevitable, and that we consequently have many more possibilities before us than we imagine.”

Yuval Noah Harari from Sapiens

 

15. “Maybe life doesn’t get any better than this, or any worse, and what we get is just what we’re willing to find: small wonders where they grow.”

Barbara Kingsolver from Small Wonder

 

16. “The opposite of fear is love – love of the challenge, love of the work, the pure joyous passion to take a shot at our dream and see if we can pull it off.”

Steven Pressfield from Do the Work

 

17. “You may be born into a family, but you walk into friendships. Some you’ll discover you should put behind you. Others are worth every risk.”

Adam Silvera from They Both Die At The End

 

18. “It was impossible to feel alone in a room full of favorite books. I had the sense that they knew me personally, that they’d read me cover to cover as I’d read them.”

Riley Redgate from Noteworthy

 

19. “The only way we will survive is by being kind. The only way we can get by in this world is through the help we receive from others. No one can do it alone, no matter how great the machines are.”

Amy Poehler from Yes, Please

 

20. “Most enjoyable activities are not natural; they demand an effort that initially one is reluctant to make. But once the interaction starts to provide feedback to the person’s skills, it usually begins to be intrinsically rewarding.”

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi from Flow

 

21. “And it occurred to him that there were two parts to being a better person. One part was thinking about other people. The other part was not giving a toss what other people thought.”

Mark Haddon from A Spot of Bother

 

22. “Nothing can bring you peace but yourself.”

Dale Carnegie from How to Stop Worrying and Start Living

 

23. “What you do for yourself dies with you when you leave this world, what you do for others lives on forever.”

Ken Robinson from The Element

 

24.“Read, learn, work it up, go to the literature. Information is control.”

Joan Didion from The Year of Magical Thinking

 

25. “Brave doesn’t mean you’re not scared. It means you go on even though you’re scared.”

Angie Thomas from The Hate U Give

 

Becoming Michelle Obama: 5 Details Revealed in Her Memoir

Becoming Michelle Obama: 5 Details Revealed in her Memoir - Book Cover

Michelle Obama’s memoir Becoming just dropped onto bookshelves a couple of days ago, but it’s already become a #1 national bestseller. In fact, the highly anticipated book grabbed the most pre-order sales of any new release since 2015.

So, what will you discover in the former first lady’s intimate book?

Let’s take a peek inside the pages. Here are five personal details from Michelle Obama’s life before and after her time in the White House — all revealed inside Becoming.

 

1. Michelle once snuck out of the White House.

With her daughter Malia by her side, Michelle snuck out of their presidential home after the Supreme Court made the decision to legalize gay marriage. Why? They wanted to see the White House displayed in rainbow lights. The only problem was they couldn’t get past the locked doors until some staff members helped them find an exit.

 

2. She has some opinions about President Donald Trump.

Michelle shares several thoughts on Donald Trump, including the one thing she’ll never excuse: questioning Barack Obama’s birth certificate.  “Donald Trump, with his loud and reckless innuendos, was putting my family’s safety at risk. And for this, I’d never forgive him,” she explains.

 

3. What wearing that custom-made Jason Wu gown to the inaugural ball meant to her:

“The dress resurrected the dreaminess of my family’s metamorphosis, the promise of this entire experience, transforming me if not into a full-blown ballroom princess, then at least into a woman capable of climbing onto another stage. I was now FLOTUS — First Lady of the United States — to Barack’s POTUS. It was time to celebrate.”

 

4. Michelle opens up about her painful struggle to have children.

In her memoir, Michelle writes about the difficulty she faced in becoming pregnant and the IVF process that followed.

“We were trying to get pregnant and it wasn’t going well. We had one pregnancy test come back positive, which caused us both to forget every worry and swoon with joy, but a couple of weeks later I had a miscarriage, which left me physically uncomfortable and cratered any optimism we felt.”

 

5. Her marriage takes work too.

Even though they might look like the perfect couple from afar, the Obamas are proof that every marriage has its ups and down. Michelle digs into the details about how she attended marriage counseling with her husband to work through some of their issues. Initially, he was against seeing a therapist and thought it seemed dramatic.

But as Michelle tell us, it later turned out to be an incredible turning point in their relationship.

It turns out they’re more like us than we thought.

You might be wondering if the former first lady addresses her future in politics. Will Michelle ever run for the presidency? Well, if you’ve been waiting for a Michelle in 2020 campaign, we have some bad news to tell you.

According to the Washington Post, “I’ve never been a fan of politics, and my experience over the last ten years has done little to change that. I continue to be put off by the nastiness,” she stated.

In the meantime, you can pick up a copy of Michelle Obama’s memoir right here at Textbook Nova.

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once)

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once): Stepping In Leaves

Why should we read memoirs in the first place?

Because they connect us. Hearing the true experiences of people and cultures–many are vastly different from what we know in our lives–broadens our perspective.

Memoirs are gritty, messy, and don’t always come with a happy ending. But they can help us understand each other better. Here are five memoirs to check out the next time you need to flip your outlook on life.

 

I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban, by Malala Yousafzai and Christina Lamb

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once): I Am Malala cover

This is the autobiography of Malala Yousafzi, and what happened after her hometown of Swat Valley, Pakistan, was taken over by the Taliban. The youngest person to ever win a Nobel Peace Prize, Malala risked her life for the right to be educated.

She was shot in the head at point-blank range by a terrorist on her way home from school one afternoon. No one expected the 15-year old to survive the brain injuries sustained from the attack. Malala’s story is eye-opening but full of hope and insight.

 

The Year of Less by Cait Flanders

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once): The Year of Less Cover

What happens when one twenty-something woman decides to stop shopping for an entire year? This is the story of Cait Flanders, who threw out half of her belongings and vowed to quit spending money for 12 months.

During this year-long challenge, Cait discovers what creating a meaningful life is really about. She runs into lessons about toxic relationships, the cycle of Netflix binges, and finding joy in our careers.

 

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns), by Mindy Kaling

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once): Mindy Kaling cover

Looking for a book you can’t put down? Mindy Kaling’s memoir is full of laughs and authenticity. Her charismatic story makes you feel like you’re sitting down with an old friend, no matter what age you are.

Even if you don’t know of Mindy’s work or you’re not a fan of her tv shows, this book is worth a read. She tells things like it is, with an inconvenient (but relatable) tendency to blurt out whatever is on her mind at any given moment.

 

Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once): Men We Reaped Cover

Jesmyn Ward’s intensely personal story of race, poverty, and growing up in rural Mississippi is unforgettable. She wrote this memoir while grieving the death of five men in her life in less than five years.

She weaves the stories of this five men in between her own. The result is raw, heartbreaking, and more timely than ever during the Black Lives Matter movement.

 

Wave by Sonali Deraniyagala

5 Famous Memoir Books Worth Reading (At Least Once): Wave cover

December 26, 2004, would change Sonali’s life forever. That’s when Sri Lanka was struck by an earthquake and tsunami so devastating, it’s still named one of the top-ten deadliest natural disasters in history.

This memoir is not an easy read by any means. It’s downright painful to get through many parts of the book. Sonali lost her parents, her husbands, and her two children in the tsunami. Somehow, she survived.